Who I Serve?

“People fail to get along because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they don’t know each other because they have not communicated with each other.” 
 ~ Martin Luther King, Jr., Civil Rights Pioneer

Collective Voices services lift barriers between people and create conditions for increased understanding and trust, empathy, equal voice, and listening. This allows for the strengthening of relationships across lines of hurt, conflict, division, race, gender, religion, socioeconomics, hostility, power dynamics, and varying perspectives. 

 

Collective Voices services offer an opportunity for people to break the silence and patterns of conflict - to talk about what matters to them, hear what matters to others, begin to humanize and respect differences, and ​find a durable path forward.

Who Benefits From Collective Voices:

  • Families

  • Individuals 

  • Incarcerated individuals

  • First Nations tribes

  • Schools

  • Community organizations

  • Wellness programs

  • Public safety and justice agencies

  • Government agencies

  • Corporate businesses

  • Any workplace

All services can be used to address: 

  • Grief and loss

  • Family reunification

  • Conflict/repair

  • Impacts of poverty

  • Violence

  • Systemic and racial oppression

  • Divorce/separation

  • Concerns around alcohol/drug use and addiction

  • Crime/legal issue

  • Patterns of power dynamics

  • Lack of understanding one another's perspective

  • Impacts of violence

  • Illness/death

  • Shifting a work-place culture of judgement, shame, and blame to that of mutual understanding.

  • Impacts of and concerns around growth/change

"When we walk to the edge of all the light we have and take that set into the darkness of the unknown, we must believe that one of two things will happen: there will be something solid for us to stand on, or, we will be taught how to fly."                                                                                                          ~ Patrick Overto